IoT Protocols

Internet of Things (IoT) Protocols go beyond the connectivity of traditional equipment such as desktop computers, laptops, tablets, printers, and phones to include embedded technologies such as security systems, thermostats, and home lighting systems – all via the Internet.

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the constantly evolving network of objects that feature an IP address for Internet connectivity and the communication that occurs between these objects and other Internet-enabled devices and systems. IoT goes beyond the connectivity of traditional equipment such as desktop computers, laptops, tablets, printers, and phones and can include embedded technologies such as security systems, thermostats, and home lighting systems – all via the Internet.

IoT Protocols

Because of the wide array of technologies that fall within the IoT, there are a large number of IoT Protocols. Some are more well-known than others. Some of these protocols include:

Bluetooth: Most commonly used for short-range communications in computing and consumer product markets. It is key for wearable products via a smartphone.

Zigbee: ZigBee PRO and ZigBee Remote Control as well as other available ZigBee profiles, are based on the IEEE802.15.4 protocol, which is an industry-standard wireless networking technology operating at 2.4GHz targeting applications. Data exchanges take place at low data-rates over a restricted area within a 100m range.

Z-Wave: A low-power RF communications technology that is primarily designed for home automation for products such as lamp controllers and sensors.

6LowPAN: While Bluetooth and ZigBee are application protocols, 6LowPAN is an IP-based network protocol that defines encapsulation and header compression mechanisms. 6LowPAN can be used across multiple communication platforms, including Ethernet, Wi-Fi, 802.15.4 and sub-1GHz ISM.